Get Involved Organization 3: Schools for Schools

February 18, 2009

No one understands students like students.

That’s why I’m a big fan of Schools for Schools, a program run through Invisible Children, an organization that seeks to raise money and awareness to help end the longest-running war in Africa (in northern Uganda). The program partners schools in other parts of Uganda with a school in the war-torn North that badly needs rebuilding.

 

Children at a Ugandan school.

Children at a Ugandan school.

I spoke with Alli Coritz, an active member in Invisible Children and Schools for Schools, to see what her work is all about.

What spurred the creation of Invisible Children?
Alli Coritz: Invisible Children started when three guys in their early 20s decided to go to Africa, hoping they’d stumble upon an interesting story to film. What they found were millions of people in displaced camps in horrible conditions. What really got them motivated was the plight of the children; in order to avoid being forced to be child soldiers, children walked miles each morning and night into the town centers to sleep en masse with a few armed guards to avoid getting kidnapped. When these three men got back to the United States, they decided to do something to raise awareness about the situation.

How did Schools for Schools start?
AC: Schools for Schools began as a way to motivate the youth in Uganda in a friendly competition to raise money to help fund their peers’ educations.

I’m interested in helping Schools for Schools. What are my options?
1. Attend meetings at Arizona State University Tuesdays at 5 p.m.
2. Join the Facebook group in order to find out what events are going on around campus.
3. Join the mailing list at s4sasu@gmail.com.
4. Make a monetary donation.
5. Bring used textbooks to the fall semester book drive.
6. Donate electronics you no longer need to a drive also held during fall semester.

What have you gotten out of working with Schools for Schools?
AC: Not only did participation in Schools for Schools broaden my knowledge of what’s occurring outside of the U.S., I also have a real sense of accomplishment. I know that I am helping people around my own age achieve what is so easily handed to us here – an education.

  

*If you like this organization, you might also be interested in working with: The Central Asia Institute, a non-profit that helps build schools, especially for girls, in remote regions of Pakistan and Afghanistan.  The path to the creation of the CAI is detailed in the bestseller Three Cups of Tea.

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